Posted at 1 p.m. Oct. 24, 2016

Bob Salazar Don Erickson Jennifer Peterson Jess Ketcham Rachel Meeker
Rick Jansen Ryan Lindsey Sleeter Dover Veronica Pedersen Wendy Soto

Meet the trustee candidates

Bob Salazar

Age: 61. Occupation: 24 years in Defense and Telecommunications (Engineering Economics, System Engineering, Business/Technology Intelligence, Research & Development management, international business development), 1978–2002; 14 years math/statistics teacher for LCSD1 (retired June 2016); adjunct instructor LCCC statistics (retired June 2016) Hometown: Cheyenne. Education: Bachelor of Science in Statistics with a minor in economics from University of Wyoming; Master of Science in Systems Science/R&D Management from University of Denver; Education Teaching Certification from University of Wyoming; National Board Certified Teacher in Mathematics. Prior Elected Office: None, but currently on the board of Poder Academy Charter School

Don Erickson

Came to Cheyenne in the mid 1960s to be the state health educator. Subsequently served as the Wyoming director of WICHE Mountain States Regional Medical Program. From 1977 to 1989 I was the mayor of Cheyenne after which I owned the Don Erickson Planning Service. I have served on numerous health and civic boards and organizations. Currently retired and married to Jacqueline with five children and six grandchildren.

Jennifer Peterson

I grew up in Cheyenne most of my life, graduating from East High School in 2004. From there, I received my A.S. in Finance from LCCC in 2007 and my B.S. in Finance from UW in 2009. I have remained in Cheyenne and currently work for the Wyoming Department of Education. While here at the department, I have held two positions - the first as the Title I Program Manager for the state of Wyoming and currently, since 2014, a Hathaway Scholarship Program consultant.  

Jess Ketcham

My name is Jess Ketcham. I am a 5th generation Laramie County resident. My wife Kelly is a 2nd grade teacher at Henderson Elementary School. I have 2 boys, Jace and Jack, and they both attend Saddle Ridge Elementary School. I went to school in Cheyenne from kindergarten through 12th grade, graduating from East High School. I then chose to attend LCCC to study Agriculture Education; after transferring to the University of Wyoming I graduated with a B.S. in Agriculture Business. After graduation, I accepted a position as a personal banker at Wells Fargo Bank in Cheyenne. I then decided to work for the state of Wyoming in the Banking Division as a senior auditor for 8 years until I was offered a position with the Budget Division as a senior budget analyst and have been with that office for 5 years. I am also a lead assistant chairman for the Parades Committee for Cheyenne Frontier Days.

Rachel Meeker

My name is Rachel Meeker. I was born and raised in Cheyenne. I am married to Zachary and we have three children: Noah, Maya and Nevaeh. I am a graduate of Triumph High School and technically was the last class of High School III. I started at Laramie County Community College by taking one or two classes at a time and was grateful to be able to work, raise a family, and have the opportunity to attend class in the evenings. I received my associate’s degree in accounting from LCCC in 2009. I was the first in my family to obtain a degree in higher education. In 2012, I enrolled with University of Phoenix to pursue my bachelor’s degree in accounting and graduated in 2014. I am currently a year from completing my master’s degree in business administration with Western Governor’s University. The education and help I received from LCCC staff built a solid foundation of learning for me and has played a major role in my career. Outside of work and school I enjoy running, weight lifting, family time, sports and cooking. This year I completed my first marathon. I have completed several races of the past years from 5ks to half marathons.

Rick Jansen

Rick Jansen was born and raised in South Dakota and graduated from university of South Dakota in 1977 (B.S. biology). He has been a Wyoming resident since 1978.

Jansen was privileged to serve as a member of the city of Laramie Fire Department from 1979-2009. During his fire service career, he was promoted through the ranks and retired as the division chief of the life safety and fire prevention unit.

Jansen was the emergency management coordinator for Albany County (2012-2013) prior to taking his current position with the Wyoming Department of Health as a preparedness and response coordinator with the Public Health division’s Public Health Emergency Preparedness unit in late 2013. His focus is preparedness planning for at-risk populations during public health emergencies.

Jansen’s wife, Carol, is a lifelong Cheyenne resident who attended LCCC and graduated from UW. They are parents to five adult children and have four grandchildren.

Ryan Lindsey

I was born in Laramie, Wyoming, graduated high school from Marine Military Academy in South Texas. I then moved to Florida and went to school for massage therapy in Tallahassee where I practiced before moving back to Wyoming in 2008. In 2014 I left massage for nursing school at LCCC and graduated from the program earlier this year. I have traveled extensively throughout my life, visiting every continent except Africa, and it is on my list. In 2015 I married Tiffany Marzluf, my best friend.

Sleeter Dover

Birth: Feb. 24, 1947. State: South Carolina. Email: Sdover@bresnan.net. Wife: Cathy A. Dover, M.Ed. Son: Gregory Donovan Dover, BA. Daughter-in-Law: Stacey Marie Dover. Granddaughter: Maya Jean ‘jellybean’ Dover

Professional/civic association/clubs: American Bar Association; Wyoming State Bar; Laramie County Bar Association; past board, Community Action of Laramie County; 20 years Cheyenne Frontier Days ticket committee; past volunteer, United Way of Laramie County; Past board president, WyHy Federal Credit Union; past member, Cheyenne Rotary Club; past president, Cheyenne Exchange Club; volunteer driver, Meals on Wheels.

Awards: Outstanding young men of America, 1978; Region Eight (Rocky Mountain) civil rights awards, 1982; Cheyenne Head Start “Silver Tricycle” award, 1986; WyHy Federal Credit Union board president’s award, 1988; Gubernatorial appointment, Wyoming assistant attorney general, 1992; Wyoming Senate confirmation, Wyoming Department of Transportation Director, 2000; Western Association of State Highway and Transportation Official president, 2002-2003; American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials board of director’s executive committee award, 2004; administrators public service award, federal highway administration, 2005; executive director appointment by Wyoming State Board of Directors, 2007; Wyoming Supreme Court appointment to Wyoming Access to Justice Commission, 2008; Wyoming delegate, Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, N.C., 2012; Appointment as chairman of Wyoming state advisory committee to the U.S Commission on Civil Rights, 2014

Military service: Veteran, United States Air Force.

Veronica Pedersen

I have lived in Cheyenne since 2003. I am a mom to Jesse, age 6, and I’ve worked at Magellan Health since July 2015 doing statewide community outreach for a children’s mental health contract. I have a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Purdue University and a Master of Social Work from Indiana University.

Wendy Soto

I am a fourth-generation Wyoming native and longtime Laramie County resident. I’ve lived in Wyoming my entire life, raising four children while working and attending college much of my adult life.  

I’m a charter graduate of the LCCC paralegal program in 1990. I obtained a general studies associate degree in 2004 as part of the program to obtain my bachelor’s degree in social science from UW in 2005. That was followed by a master’s in public administration in 2012. Many of the classes in my bachelor’s and master’s programs were held on the LCCC campus.

I worked as a paralegal for private practice litigation firms and taught in the LCCC paralegal program for many years. Employed with the state of Wyoming since 1999, I served 13 years with the Board of Equalization. In June of 2012 I became the executive director of Wyoming’s Commission on Judicial Conduct and Ethics. I have served on the board of directors for the Legal Assistants of Wyoming, Community Action of Laramie County, Cheyenne Little Theatre Players, Wyoming Equality, the Advisory Committee for the LCCC paralegal program and as a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity.

What ideas do you have that would make the campus more efficient and save money?

Bob Salazar

I believe efficiency has two major aspects: One, improving an existing process or organization, so that an increased level of service or output is attained; and two, reducing applied resources if there are more than what is needed to handle the normal and stress loads. So, at my current level of knowledge about the campus and stakeholders it would be premature to give a specific action to undertake. That said, I would propose that a performance audit be undertaken in campus areas where one or both of the aspects I mentioned can be assessed. With this information in hand and in context of the mission of LCCC, specific fact-based decisions can be made that (hopefully) limit impact on the goals and needs of all stakeholders.

Jennifer Peterson

I think it’s important to research all programs and areas in order to determine if a cut or reallocation may be necessary. Prior to making any decisions, reviewing all relevant information from staff members, students, and the community - all stakeholders who are involved with LCCC - is crucial. 

Jess Ketcham

One way to make LCCC more efficient would be to consolidate more services such as IT. If you work together with the state of Wyoming or other entity by combining IT services, you would be able save money on Technology by being able to purchase bulk hardware and software at cheaper rates. I would also like to review all vacant positions within LCCC to see if you could remove these and not cut positions with personnel in them. This may reduce the budget if there are many vacancies. I would also like to see each program evaluated and determine how to reduce each of these without eliminating the program or hurting the efficiency of the program to the students. Another idea I have is to start a Trades Specialist course that would specifically deal with the new open space available when the Pathfinder building will be complete. Students will be able to re-purpose this space and earn credit to do it and get hands-on experience dealing with commercial construction while completing it at a minimal cost.

Rachel Meeker

Ideas I would like to share with the efficiency committee start with working with LCCC staff and students as well as the current board to obtain an understanding about the ideas and efficiencies they think will work best from their points of view. I do have general ideas to share and discuss for LCCC staff, students and current board members to consider and help me understand if they would be a consideration to keep in mind. I truly believe the best ideas will come from the people who spend the most time using the resources for their learning, teaching and program needs. I would like to see more campus housing being developed to boost enrollment from students outside of the city. LCCC has a quality program and should be able to offer housing for students who wish to attend here and want to live on campus. This could mean working with the city to provide off-campus housing that is affordable and close to LCCC. I think course redesign could cut costs per student and increase efficiency. The efficiency committee could look into ways the college could create its own energy to cut costs in that area, especially with wind or solar energy.

Rick Jansen

I would suggest postponing certain capital projects such as the wayfinding initiatives, enhancements to campus entrances, and other projects that represent “wants” in favor of funding identified education “needs.”

If a campus energy efficiency study has not been recently undertaken, I would advocate for conducting such a study to determine the benefits vs. costs analysis of switching to LED bulbs to replace mercury vapor, florescent, and incandescent bulbs; improved HVAC systems and control; room occupant motion-controlled lighting; evaluation of current methods of building and HVAC-related insulation and the potential use of current technologies; and negotiation of utility rates to achieve potential savings.

Explore the use of gray water and well water for landscaping irrigation cost savings, if this has not already been considered. Utilize landscaping plant varieties that require less frequent irrigation to maintain a green appearance.

Some persons see community enrichment classes as non-essential to the mission of the College. I do not share that philosophy, but view such classes as essential to continued community support for the College. I would propose an evaluation of community enrichment programs based on their value to the community (employers, employees and county taxpayers). Efficiencies might be achieved by reducing the number of offerings rather than eliminating such offerings completely.

It has been suggested that the current advising system has resulted in increased costs and produced less-effective results for students when compared to the previous faculty-based system. The costs of both should be evaluated, but effectiveness should be the primary determining factor.

Ryan Lindsey

Allow instructors to serve as advisors to the students they instruct, eliminate redundant tasks and positions, and look at the utilities to see where efficiency can be improved.  If we can reverse the decline in enrollment we may improve efficiency by having instructors teach larger classes. I am interested in what the committee has to say and what portion of the committee are full-time faculty.

Sleeter Dover

I am encouraged to know the efforts are currently underway in implementing “continuous improvement” operational principles. These principles should be continued and expanded throughout the length and breadth of the institution until fully immersed into daily culture at all operational and functional levels.

Focused engagement, use and trust in current human resources assets and intellectual and capital. Drawing upon personal managerial and administrative history, I am constitutionally and professionally toward trusting, supporting and mobilizing in-house expertise and talent. Without dogmatically excluding the possibility and sometimes necessity and engaging and depending on outside professional assistance and guidance, I would never less always initially look inside toward available assets and technological solutions or enhancements.

Veronica Pedersen

It is always a good idea to look at extras, like travel expenses, as well as attrition of staff when budget cuts are needed.

Wendy Soto

A. As a candidate, and someone who is not yet familiar with the operation of the college, I am not in a position to adequately respond to this question.  Because I have been attending trustee meetings since last spring, I am aware there is a committee made up of stakeholders at the college studying this issue. I trust the committee and its members who have the necessary expertise to make wise and reasoned recommendations for saving through efficiency. If elected and asked, I will consider those recommendations.

What guiding principles should LCCC use to determine where the upcoming budget cuts are made?

Bob Salazar

I have a personal mission statement that applies to this situation – “Seek Balance, Flexibility, Endurance and Strength in all areas of my life.” So in addressing any funding issues a balanced perspective must be kept relative to short-term and strategic needs. The approaches to the cuts must be (strategically) flexible so that if situations change, funding can also change. Endurance means that the budget seeks to fund items for the long-term benefit. And finally, strength means that the budget items need to be at the right level to be effective.

Don Erickson

The fiscal 2018 budget preparation is well underway. The board approved an approach that will bring a tentative FY18 budget to the board in early December. Our task: Maintain quality educational offerings for our students throughout the current economic downturn.

The Board acknowledged and endorsed the Administration’s four guiding principles to FY18 budget reallocations: 1) students and stakeholders come first, 2) encourage commitment with an open process, 3) disciplined decision making that is evidence-based, and 4) humanistic, we are dealing with people.

Jennifer Peterson

It’s critical to work collaboratively as a board and to include staff, students and the community throughout the process in order to determine the areas and programs to cut or reduce. Continued communication between all stakeholders regarding input and ongoing circumstances is important, especially during times of uncertainty. Additionally, I believe LCCC should ensure reductions or reallocations will continue to allow the college to remain competitive regarding the programs offered.

Jess Ketcham

The guiding principles that best work to determine where cuts will be made in FY17 and FY18 would be to establish some broad goals for LCCC that the stakeholders want to have completed either through the current strategic plan and even going further past 2020 if the current strategic plan is completed before then. Once a consensus has been reached on the priorities and needs of the established goals the stakeholders can develop approaches to achieve these goals. A budget must then be developed to achieve these goals specific to the constraints of available resources and the priority and need of each goal. Once the budget has been implemented for each specific goal or program the stakeholders must evaluate them and make adjustments accordingly to stay within the parameters of available resources. Most of how these principles will be implemented will be determined by the outcome of Section 320 within the budget bill. This section pertains to how the funding model will be improved upon or changed in the upcoming Legislative session.

Rachel Meeker

The guiding principles for the budget cuts are going to be the LCCC vision, mission, and strategic goals. Decisions made during this process should not take away from these three components. The task will not be simple and will not be taken lightly. I am prepared to gain understanding from LCCC staff to see where the most reasonable budget cuts should be made without sacrificing LCCC vision, mission, and strategic goals.

Rick Jansen

LCCC’s primary mission is as an educational gateway for certificate and two-year degree programs. As part of that mission, LCCC also serves as an entry point for those seeking to transfer to four-year degree programs at the University of Wyoming and other similar institutions. The preservation of that primary mission and the core curriculum must guide efforts to enhance revenues and manage/reduce expenditures.

While capital projects are important to the College’s future, current and future capital construction projects must be reviewed in light of the FY17/FY18 cuts and potential cuts in the following biennium budget.

The 2013 Strategic Plan was originally drafted during a period of stable funding and recent capital projects benefitted from additional investments of state funding. While the Strategic Plan was recently reviewed with regard to progress toward the original 2013 goals and objectives, those same goals and objectives should be re-evaluated in light of reduced future funding levels.

LCCC programs should be subjected to an in-depth review to determine their validity to the primary mission of the College and justify continued, though possibly reduced, funding.

Ryan Lindsey

We have to protect the core of this school as a nurse would protect the heart and lungs of a patient, and the students and the faculty make up that core. Cutting from either of these areas would be more destructive to the school over the long haul than any loss of funding. The $4.5 million needs to be met by matching cuts and increasing revenue. 

Sleeter Dover

Principle No. 1: Focus on core mission: My research indicates that there are three “core” service areas at LCCC: Academic Affairs, Student Services and administration and finance. Four “secondary” areas, for a total of seven functional operating service area.

As a matter of organizational trusteeship, I am of the opinion that primary trust obligation must ultimately defer to the historically prioritized three “core” service areas. However, it is instructive to note that exclusive deference to institutional core service areas should only be exercised under extreme budget crisis circumstances in such instances, my inclination would be to exert every effort, and to support every policy and action necessary, to protect and maintain the constituent-supported mandate for the organizational and institutional viability of the core service areas as outlined herein.

Recent investigation seems to indicate that due to the foresight and timely actions of the current functional LCCC Board of Trustees, the FY 2017 reductions, while certainly unwelcomed and hurtful, they appear to be realistically manageable at this time.

Principle No 2: Maintenance of cooperative governance environment: Absent need to consider “worst case scenarios,” I would be inclined to advocate for adopting a strategy of maintaining ongoing budgetary allocation based on historical (i.e. previous for 10-year percentage averages of budget allocations), across all seven service areas. As I had had direct and successful personal experience in applying this very same budgetary strategy, I can attest to its visibility in preventing any individual service areas from feeling as if they are perceived and treated in a “second class-citizen” fashion. Such an approach, in my opinion, would further the cause of “second class-citizen” fashion. Such an approach, in my opinion, would further the cause of “cooperative governance” philosophy and thus enhance the continuous improvement and “all in” culture we all should seek.

Veronica Pedersen

Keep students and community needs first by asking for their input about the budget, with staff and faculty also having a say.  The generation of these kinds of ideas is already underway with the president’s initiatives and multiple committees.

Wendy Soto

LCCC must consider people as a guiding principle when determining where cuts will be made.  The college must continue to provide a quality education and services to the students while balancing the budget. In order to do this, it must also make every effort to maintain quality personnel. While I am aware budget reduction will effect students and personnel, the college must do all it can to minimize the impact to people.

What influenced your decision to run for the Laramie County Community College Board of Trustees?

Trustee open forum and mayoral debate broadcast

Did you miss the open forum and debate on Oct. 4? It is available on Wingspan Online at wingspan.lccc.wy.edu

Bob Salazar

I am running for the LCCC board because, as a former educator, I understand and have a passion for educational excellence. In addition, I have the background and experience with strategy and economics from my career running projects in defense and telecommunications R&D. This background will be useful in tackling the challenges (both budgetary and strategic) that the college and board must address.

Don Erickson

Four years ago I was first elected to the board. I serve as the board’s treasurer and chairman of the Facilities and Finance Committee. I thoroughly enjoy my work with the board. The interaction with the students as well as board work is most fulfilling.

Jennifer Peterson

I really enjoyed my time spent at LCCC. I also felt the professors and programs prepared me very well for my time at UW. I would like to be a small part of helping students enjoy their experience at LCCC and give back to the community and school that helped me throughout my education.

Jess Ketcham

I am pursuing a position on the LCCC Board of Trustees because as a past student of LCCC, a father of 2 young boys who may one day have the opportunity to attend LCCC, and as a 5th generation Laramie County resident I want to be able to maintain the quality education coupled with quality facilities provided to students and faculty alike at LCCC. I want to see the LCCC 2020 Strategic Plan that was adopted in 2013 stay on track and be completed. My experience with budgets and the legislative process afford me the knowledge to help LCCC move forward through tough economic times. The most important priorities for LCCC is to give students an affordable education that can give them a well-deserved higher wage job when they graduate and also an opportunity to transfer to a university with ease if they so choose to further their education.

Rachel Meeker

I have gained over 13 years of accounting experience in the private and public sectors. Throughout my career I have worked for local Cheyenne companies such as Align, formerly WSLC; McGee, Hearne, & Paiz, LLP.; Simon Contractors; and the state of Wyoming. The culture of these companies encouraged community involvement. I am at a point in my career where I feel confident in my skills and knowledge and wanted to take a bigger step to serve my community. As an LCCC alumna, I thought this would be an opportunity to serve and give back to the college that provided the foundation for my career. Trustees who have financial and accounting backgrounds are going to be essential in the decision-making processes the board will be facing in the immediate future following the election. The timing seemed right to pursue an opportunity to serve on the LCCC Board of Trustees.

Rick Jansen

A number of factors contributed to my decision to become a candidate for the LCCC Board of Trustees. Foremost, I am a firm believer in the power of higher education. Higher education made me a better employee, enhanced my earning power, and provided opportunities that I would not have attained without my education.

My generation (age 55-64) attained the highest graduation rate in the world, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The United States currently ranks 12th in the world in the number of graduates (ages 25-34) and that ranking sustains our economy without adequately funding and improving our institutions of higher learning. We must demand the highest levels of performance from those institutions and their management in terms of preparing and graduating students who can contribute in the workplace and as members of the community.

LCCC and the Albany County Campus provide two entry points into the higher education system both locally and regionally. Enrollment and graduation rates are declining at LCCC. State funding is decreasing and that trend is anticipated to continue for the foreseeable future. LCCC’s reputation has recently been diminished when compared to its past performance. The LCCC Board of Trustees must be leaders in restoring the College’s reputation and enhancing its performance.

Campus morale remains low among students, faculty and staff. While some progress has been achieved to correct the morale issues, more work needs to be done in these areas. Previous morale surveys had respondent comments published, but that is not the case with the most recent surveys. Better communications between administration, faculty, staff and student representatives with board oversight must lead to mutual respect, exchange of ideas and the implementation of solutions that will enhance all aspects of campus morale.

I feel I can provide a fresh, unbiased perspective if elected to the LCCC Board of Trustees. I will ask the tough questions, seek complete answers to those questions and attempt to implement effective solutions to help lead LCCC through the remainder of the decade.

Ryan Lindsey

While a student and tutor at LCCC I saw many great things going on at the school that I wanted to be a part of, especially the new buildings and entrances that have emerged on campus. However, many faculty and students I am close with make it clear that both groups are being taken for granted and I want to see that change. The school will face many challenges in the next four years, and I want to see it emerge from them stronger and more dedicated to inspired learning than ever before.

Sleeter Dover

Community service. Upon arriving in this community in May of 1975 from my tour of duty in Southeast Asia, this state and city of Cheyenne has taken me and my then-developing family into its warm bosom and provided us with and idealistic, fulfilling and wholesome life. The life-history outlined in my accompanying biographical data hopefully provides sufficient indicia of this states’ and this communities’ commitment, trust and fidelity toward me and my family, and I truly believe I had therefore demonstrated my reciprocal commitment to it as well.

Over time, on information and belief, I have come to recognize that far too many candidates for office seem to be motivated by single, personal or even hidden agendas. Hopefully, and without sounding too self-serving, I can in good conscience and without fear of contradiction, categorically state that my sole interest and motivation in seeking this post is to simply meet my personal goal of continuing to contribute the sum total of my knowledge, skills, abilities and life experiences in the advancement, growth, development and substances of LCCC, this state and the community at large.

Veronica Pedersen

I know the important work the college is doing in our community, and I want to make a contribution to that mission. I worked at the college from 2004 to 2015 in 4 different areas of the college, and have since volunteered there (Teaching psychology as an adjunct, Student Services, Workforce Development, and the Certified Public Manager Program.)  My parents benefitted from the kinds of programs the college offers as non-traditional students, and I have had tremendous opportunities as a result of my time at the college.

Wendy Soto

I want to give back to the college. LCCC, its staff and faculty helped me change my life. I was a single mother on state assistance when I first walked through the doors of LCCC. Because of the education and support this college provided to me, I earned a degree and the self-confidence to believe my life, and the lives of my children could be better.  LCCC has given a great deal to me and I have a deep passion for the college.  

In addition, as a long time state employee and the director of a small state agency, I have experience in managing public programs. I am familiar with the budget process, have experience evaluating budgets and have been through the process of reducing budgets. I believe this knowledge and experience will serve the college well in the current fiscal climate.  

I believe my passion for the college, and my experiences as a student, an instructor, and as a public administrator will bring a well-rounded and unique perspective to the Board of Trustees.

LCCC has launched a revenue committee to try and find areas where the college can diversify its revenue. What ideas do you have that would increase revenue for the campus?

Bob Salazar

One easy way to increase revenues is tied to full utilization of the current assets of the college. The performance audit, mentioned above, would provide information where opportunities exist to increase utilization. To the extent it is possible – there could be an option to have greater (charged for) community use of the campus facilities. Another option is to increase enrollments by making LCCC attractive to under or unserved students. This could be in existing classes that have capacity and/or by partnering with regional business interests to offer training/training space to meet business needs.

Don Erickson

The two committees, efficiency and revenue, are campus-wide ad hoc groups with the task of identifying ways to improve efficiencies and generating more dollars. The work of these groups is essential. Who best to address the task at hand than the workforce that is immediately affected? The new Board of Trustees has the ultimate responsibility to approve the FY18 budget plan which will be completed shortly after the election. It is the intent of the current trustees to orient and communicate to the trustee candidates the budget “ins and outs.”

Jennifer Peterson

In order to increase revenue, I believe LCCC should continue to work to increase enrollment, especially in regard to the programs that have increasing interest and allow students to remain competitive when entering the workforce or continuing their education at a four-year institution. 

Jess Ketcham

A. I believe the best way to diversify revenue would be to use the facilities that are already available to the community. One option the community may support would be something like “Friday’s on the Dirt”; this would be like Friday’s on the Plaza but during the winter months in the arena depending on space and facility availability. With the opening of the new Pathfinder and Flex-Tech buildings, enrollment should increase. Enrollment changes will have to be reviewed over the course of the year but should show an increase in revenue in the future. I would also like to look at the possibility of raising dorm room rates to offset revenue if other opportunities don’t present themselves.

Rachel Meeker

I think there are many ways LCCC can increase its revenue the key is going to be aligning it with LCCC’s vision, mission and strategic goals. I would be very interested in listening to and understanding ideas the revenue committee has worked on and brainstormed. Possibilities I have thought about are investing an interest in a local hotel to help bring business conferences and training into the area. This idea could also provide new program opportunities and experience for students. I think facility rental agreements with local athletic clubs could be profitable because there is limited indoor space available in the community available to youth club teams. Tuition models for certain programs that create revenue to offset tuition could be another revenue source to look further into. Increased recruitment of out-of-state or international student agreements could gain more revenue for the school as well.

Rick Jansen

Information provided to the candidates demonstrate a trend toward declining enrollments over the past few years. Increasing enrollments in all facets of the College’s programs will obviously increase tuition-based revenues.

Tighter budgets at the municipal, county, and state levels are already reducing employee numbers in the public and private sectors. Existing employees will be seeking continuing educational opportunities to enhance their value to their employers. LCCC needs to be positioned to attract these prospective students with appropriate class offerings. Continued future revenue decreases may enhance such opportunities in FY18 and beyond.

As the state works to diversify its economy, LCCC must monitor those efforts and anticipate the related educational needs to assume a leadership position in the provision of educational offerings. LCCC must survey regional private and corporate employers to insure that LCCC programmatic offerings continue to meet their specific employee educational needs.

LCCC should explore corporate partnerships and sponsorships that could yield financial benefits in exchange for educational programs or facility-naming rights.

LCCC should explore credit transfer partnerships with other regional four-year institutions, such as UNC and CSU, in order to recruit potential students who wish to complete their four-year programs at those institutions.

LCCC should explore enhancing online credit class offerings, because such classes would require fewer physical facilities than traditional class offerings. Academic rigor must be maintained in such class offerings.

I understand that service on the LCCC Board of Trustees will require a significant commitment of time and energy. Although I am a relative newcomer to Cheyenne and Laramie County, I have a strong desire to serve my community. I know I currently lack knowledge of all of the potential issues facing the Board of Trustees. I anticipate a steep learning curve to gain that required knowledge. I pledge to do the research and make the personal connections necessary to vote in the best interests of the students, faculty and staff of LCCC and to represent the taxpayers of Laramie and Albany Counties with due diligence. I will vote my conscience on all issues.

Ryan Lindsey

Tuition accounts for roughly 22 percent of our revenues and enrollment has been in a steep decline since 2012; if we can turn that around it will solve a good deal of our financial difficulties. Seeing if we can secure additional monies from local appropriations is another idea I’d like to explore. I am interested in what the committee has to say and what portion of the committee are full-time faculty.

Sleeter Dover

Alumni Yearly Obligation: Presuming that no such program currently exists, I would propose a historical records data search for all current living LCCC alumni, with the intent of trying to establish an Alumni “IPTAY” (I pay $10, $20, $30, etc., a year) program toward revenue enhancement. I once had a dean of students advise that “it was a poor frog indeed that would not praise its own pond,” so our effort would be to ensure that all of our moved-on LCCC “frogs” would have every opportunity to praise our pond on an ongoing yearly basis.

Blue and Gold GALA: Again, presuming that no such event currently exists, I would propose establishing such a yearly “black tie” Gala fashioned on the local CRMC Foundation “Denim and Diamonds” fundraising model.

Adopt A Program: If currently nonexistent, perhaps we could establish a public-private “Adopt a Program” contributory effort where private corporate entities would “adopt” one of the LCCC service areas to make monetary, in-kind, human resource, material, and technological support and expertise to any of the seven operational LCCC service areas.

Veronica Pedersen

Look at what is working and do more of it.  Programs that start in the Workforce and Community Development part of the college often pay for themselves in tuition and grants.  That part of the college is an innovative incubator for programs that meet current workforce needs.  Programs that have long waiting lists, like Health Sciences, should be expanded to accept more qualified students.

Wendy Soto

I would like to see the LCCC student body grow through an expanded recruitment program. Recruitment of students can increase revenue through tuition and student fees. First, the college could focus on recruiting two particular groups, veterans, and those who find themselves unemployed as a result of the downturn in the mineral industry. Both groups will have opportunities for financial aid, and are in need of special attention and assistance these days. In addition, while the college is a great asset to the community, as it should be, it could also be an asset to students regionally and even nationally.  

In these times, when the cost of college can be prohibitive for many students, the ability to provide a quality educational opportunity at a reasonable cost should be very attractive to students outside of Laramie County and Wyoming.

Editor's Note; Wingspan did not receive Garth Shanklin’s Q&A packet until Oct. 14, which was after our written deadline. Shanklin decided to send in strictly the bio instead of answer the questions Wingspan asked.

Garth Shanklin

A Vietnam-era Army veteran, Garth Shanklin completed his bachelor’s degree in Copenhagen, Denmark, and holds graduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin and Colorado State University.

Shanklin was employed in Wyoming higher education for 30 years and has lived in Cheyenne since retiring as chair of the Casper College departments of Addictionology and Psychology in 2012. He was named Wyoming’s Outstanding College Faculty member for 2011.

Shanklin is currently the vice-chair of the Wyoming Retirement System Board of Trustees and is a board member and treasurer of Meridian Trust Federal Credit Unions headquartered in Cheyenne. He has also served several terms as chair of the Wyoming Mental Health Professions Licensing Board. He now serves as vice president of the board of the UU Church of Cheyenne.

Shanklin is married with three children. Alan and Mallory are graduates of Northwest College and UW. Sylvia is a high school senior at Cheyenne East where she has lettered in swimming and academics. His spouse, Arlene, works as a tele-physician for patients in underserved rural locations.

Shanklin has a passion for public service, community solutions and challenging problems. He has a depth and breadth of knowledge and experience that enables positive and informed decision making to benefit LCCC.


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