Posted Sept. 16, 2013 at 3:06 p.m.

Gallery features stop-action animator

Watching John Frame’s 12-minute movie, “Tale of the Crippled Boy,” at Laramie County Community College can bring a sensation of being drawn into another world.

“I personally believe that you reflect out what you put in whether it be books, television, philosophy, arts or whatever information you choose to intake.”

John Frame

Artist

The composition of cinematic-narrative sound and a compelling video drew 120 to the reception for the Ed and Caren Murray Art Series for a noted sculptor from California.

This composition evoked a deep, almost primal feeling from the viewer that is hard to explain because it was a combination of thoughts and feelings just spilling out as the story began to unfold. In no clear linear path the viewer was swept through visions of his hypnopompic state, which is the state of heading out of sleep between the dream world and the waking world. The completed video evoked thoughts of life, death and the possibility of rebirth. Through these thoughts it showed the beauty of life from beginning to end, along with the sorrow of death, the joy of birth and the innocence of youth.

Artist spends six years on current project

“When asked what motivates me, I just say everything,” Frame explained. “I personally believe that you reflect out what you put in whether it be books, television, philosophy, arts or whatever information you choose to intake.” Frame further explained, “From there I trust my intuition to guide me in what I am making to come straight from my heart transforming my feelings into art.”   

The Frame exhibition was in the Esther and John Clay Fine Arts Gallery Sept. 9–13. 

“We always look for events that are educational for our students, “LCCC art instructor Matt West said.
Frame lectured throughout the week in various art courses.

In 1975, Frame received his bachelor’s degree in literature from San Diego State University. In 1980, Frame received his Master’s of Fine Arts from Claremont Graduate University.

For the past six years, he has been working on a piece called “The Tale of the Crippled Boy,” which is a collection of photos, drawings and music combined with the placing of three sculptures in a stop-action film.


John Frame's website